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A-Z Of CrossFit Words You Need To Know

CrossFit is a weird world of AMRAPs and WODs that if you're new to the global fitness phenomenon that is CrossFit it might be a bit confusing.



We have gathered a full vocab of all you need to know heading into a CrossFit box.


A - AMRAP (As Many Rounds As Possible): A type of workout in which the goal is to complete as many rounds of a set of exercises within a specific time frame.


B - Box jumps: A plyometric exercise that involves jumping onto and off of a raised platform.


C - Clean and Jerk: An Olympic weightlifting movement that involves lifting a barbell from the ground to a racked position on the shoulders, followed by a Jerk, lifting the weight overhead.


D - Deadlift: A compound exercise that works the legs, back, and core, and involves picking up a weight from the ground.


E - EMOM (Every Minute on the Minute): A type of workout in which a specific exercise or set of exercises is completed at the start of every minute.


F - Fran: A benchmark workout that consists of 21-15-9 reps of thrusters and pull-ups.


G - Gymnastics: A form of functional fitness that includes exercises such as handstands and pull-ups.


H - Handstand push-up: An exercise that involves pressing up from a handstand position.


I - Interval Training: Alternating between different types of exercise, such as cardio and strength training, to improve overall fitness.


J - Jerk: An Olympic weightlifting movement that involves lifting a barbell from the shoulders to overhead.


K - Kipping: A type of movement used in exercises such as pull-ups and handstand push-ups that involves generating momentum to complete the movement.


L - Lift: A type of strength training that involves lifting weights to improve muscle size, strength and power.


M - Metcon (Metabolic Conditioning): A type of workout that combines cardiovascular and strength training exercises to improve overall fitness.


N - National Provinces Games (NPG): CrossFit competition held in different regions of countries, usually with the goal of determining the fittest athlete of that region.


O - Olympic weightlifting: A form of weightlifting that includes exercises such as the snatch and clean and jerk.


P - Powerlifting: A type of strength training that involves lifting weights to improve muscle size, strength and power.


Q - Quality of movement: Proper form and technique in exercises to reduce the risk of injury and improve effectiveness.


R - Row: A cardiovascular exercise that involves pulling a handle attached to a flywheel back and forth.


S - Squat: A compound exercise that works the legs, back, and core, and involves sitting down and standing up with a weight.


T - Timecap: The time limit assigned to a workout.


U - WOD (Workout of the Day): A specific workout that is assigned to be completed on a particular day.


V - Variation: Different forms or ways of performing an exercise or workout to challenge the body and prevent boredom.


W - Wall ball: A full-body exercise that involves holding a medicine ball and squatting down before jumping up and throwing the ball at a high target on the wall, then catching it and repeating the movement.


X - eXtended range of motion: Performing exercises with a greater range of motion than usual in order to challenge the body.


Y - Yoke: A piece of equipment used for carrying weight, often used in strongman-style exercises.


Z - Zercher squat: A squat variation that involves holding a barbell in the crook of the elbow, rather than on the shoulders or back.


These are some examples of CrossFit terms that may come handy, but it is important to remember that CrossFit is a constantly varied and high-intensity program, and it is important to start at a level that is appropriate for your current fitness level and work your way up gradually. It is also important to have proper form and technique when performing these exercises to avoid injury, and it is recommended that you learn from a qualified CrossFit coach.



How to Get Started With CrossFit


Starting out at CrossFit can be intimidating, but with the right approach, it can also be a highly rewarding and effective way to improve your fitness and overall health.


The first step in starting out at CrossFit is to find a reputable gym or box (CrossFit gym) and speak to a coach. A coach will be able to assess your current fitness level, determine any limitations you may have and help you to set goals for your training. They will also be able to teach you proper form and technique for the exercises used in CrossFit, which is essential for staying safe and getting the most out of your workouts.


It's important to start at a level that is appropriate for your current fitness level, and work your way up gradually. If you're new to exercise, your coach may recommend starting with a beginner's program or scaling back the intensity of the exercises to suit your current fitness level. The coach will also help you to create a workout plan that is tailored to your specific goals and needs.


CrossFit can be intense and demanding, especially for those who are new to it, it's important to listen to your body and take rest days when necessary. Overtraining or pushing yourself too hard can lead to injury, so it's important to pace yourself and allow your body time to recover.


[Check out our guide on how to recover from CrossFit here.]


One of the key components of CrossFit is the community, being a part of a supportive and encouraging community can help to keep you motivated and accountable. You'll be surrounded by people with similar goals, who will cheer you on and offer encouragement, advice, and support.


It's also important to pay attention to your nutrition. CrossFit is a high-intensity program and you need to fuel your body correctly to perform at your best. A well-balanced diet, including lean proteins, whole grains, and plenty of fruits and vegetables, is essential for recovery and to support your training.


In conclusion, starting out at CrossFit can be intimidating, but with the right approach and by following the guidance of a coach, it can be a highly rewarding and effective way to improve your fitness and overall health. It is important to listen to your body, start at a level that is appropriate for your current fitness level, pace yourself, and pay attention to your nutrition, and be part of a supportive community. Remember to enjoy the journey, it will be worth it.






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